Episode 2. Favourite texts on human remains collections (Ep. 2 in Anatomical bodies/collections series)

[..] especially from the sixteenth century onwards, [anatomists] have developed a wide range of techniques for preserving, modelling and displaying bodies and parts thereof. To arrest putrefaction after death, bodies have been dried or immersed in fluid, and to exhibit various aspects of these bodies practitioners have engaged in such work as sculpting, inflating, injecting,…

Virtual Anatomy Museum website & upcoming series of posts on anatomical bodies/collections

‘Exploded’ Beauchene skulls, feet in jars or mounted vertebrae lined up in wooden cupboards or behind glass door cabinets are common presences in anatomical collections. Caught between the living and the dead, organic life and man-made artifacts, they hold within stories of past and present medical, anatomical or anthropological practices and world-views. Why were they chosen…

From the Earliest Skeletal Evidence of Autopsy in the New World to disturbing bodies: new titles

In the last couple of months I’ve come across several recently released body-related titles which sound like they deserve some attention: The Bioarchaeology of Dissection and Autopsy in the United States. Editor: Kenneth C. Nystrom. Springer 2016. From the earliest skeletal evidence of anatomy in the US, to postmortem manipulations of the human body, this title aims…

‘Please don’t forget me’. The story of Paraschiva Candoiu, the lady with no hands from the ‘Francisc I. Rainer’ archive

Aleksandr Sokurov, in his latest movie, Francofonia,  wonders through the halls of the Louvre and looks into the eyes captured on canvas, through oil and paint- those painters did us a favour, he says, as they captured the souls, and through the souls the whole worlds those eyes had witnessed. Well, an Archive is a very similar place, a space where long…