Broken noses, biocultural archaeologists and murderers heads: body parts in the news

This week I’ve stumbled upon a couple of catchy news dealing with broken bodies: an upcoming symposium, a presentation video of a University of Cambridge’s Duckworth Laboratory’s project and a one of a kind museum.

University of Cambridge’s Duckworth Laboratory

“My broken nose made me ridiculous”: Unwanted Facial Modifications in the Middle Ages’, ‘Post-mortem Prosthesis: Modified Bodies and the Early Modern Afterlife’ or ‘Kneeling’ are just a handful of titles that are part of the “Modified Bodies and Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern England” symposium @ the Centre for Early Modern and Medieval Studies at the University of Sussex (Tuesday 27 May 2014, Arts B, Social Space (B274)). Not only that I love the titles, but the topic itself (body parts and spare pieces) can only be one full of surprises (I am thankful to my friend Josip for sending me this).

The second piece of news is a presentation video of a project led by Dr Ronika Power and Dr Marta Mirazon Lahr from Cambridge’s Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies (LCHES) with Dr Tamsin O’Connell from the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, who “are reading ‘biographies in bone’ in the skeletons and skulls of people who lived up to 8,000 years ago in the Sahara Desert and across the African continent. ” The 12.11 minutes film captures some interesting research procedures, (like the 3D geometric morphometrics to capture the skulls’ morphological features, isotopes analysis), decorated skulls or cobbler’s legs.

It seems that here as well, the body parts topic is a recurring motif, as they advertise themselves (the Duckworth Collection) as having skulls, mummies, death masks, blood samples, “anything that you can imagine in terms of working with the human body” 🙂

 

And last but not least, I want to share a short presentation of a museum which has been totally unknown to me before, the Museum of Criminal Anthropology in Turin, Italy, with its “wax-covered heads, brains, body parts and skulls of the soldiers, civilians and convicts whom (Cesaro Lambroso) studied“. If you follow the link herehere, or on the Morbid Anatomy blog, you can get an idea of the exhibits.

 

Duckworthas having skulls, mummies, death masks, blood samples etc., “anything that you can imagine in terms of working with the human body”
Dr Ronika Power and Dr Marta Mirazon Lahr from Cambridge’s Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies (LCHES) with Dr Tamsin O’Connell from the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research are reading these ‘biographies in bone’ in the skeletons and skulls of people who lived up to 8,000 years ago in the Sahara Desert and across the African continent. – See more at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/features/biographies-in-bone#sthash.0eEMqmIf.dpuf
Dr Ronika Power and Dr Marta Mirazon Lahr from Cambridge’s Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies (LCHES) with Dr Tamsin O’Connell from the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research are reading these ‘biographies in bone’ in the skeletons and skulls of people who lived up to 8,000 years ago in the Sahara Desert and across the African continent. – See more at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/features/biographies-in-bone#sthash.REWFOBDw.dpuf
Dr Ronika Power and Dr Marta Mirazon Lahr from Cambridge’s Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies (LCHES) with Dr Tamsin O’Connell from the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research are reading these ‘biographies in bone’ in the skeletons and skulls of people who lived up to 8,000 years ago in the Sahara Desert and across the African continent. – See more at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/features/biographies-in-bone#sthash.REWFOBDw.d3
Dr Ronika Power and Dr Marta Mirazon Lahr from Cambridge’s Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies (LCHES) with Dr Tamsin O’Connell from the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research are reading these ‘biographies in bone’ in the skeletons and skulls of people who lived up to 8,000 years ago in the Sahara Desert and across the African continent. – See more at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/features/biographies-in-bone#sthash.0eEMqmIf.
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